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Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…

BLM Leader Tianna Arata Charged With 5 Felonies

Published Yesterday Social media is coming to the aid of Tianna Arata, a California-based Black Lives Matter organizer, who was arrested after a protest last month and is now facing some serious charges. Arata was arrested by the San Luis Obispo police department on July 21 after she organized a protest that allegedly resulted in…

KRASG12C-Mutant NSCLC Likely Smoking-Related, Targetable by Brain Metastasis Therapies

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – KRASG12 C-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) seems smoking-related and is likely targetable by inhibitors that can delay or prevent brain transition, according to an analysis of real-world outcomes.

” Currently, most of druggable oncogene-driven NSCLCs occur in non-smokers/light ex-smokers,” Dr. Wanyuan Cui of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne informed Reuters Health by email. “Nevertheless, as appealing covalent KRASG12 C inhibitors continue to develop, it is essential for all clients with NSCLC to go through early detailed genomic profiling, no matter smoking history, to look for this essential targetable mutation.”

Dr. Cui and coworkers analyzed data from patients enrolled in the Thoracic Malignancies Associate between 2012 to 2019 with recurrent/metastatic non-squamous NSCLC, readily available KRAS outcomes, and without EGFR/ALK/ROS1 gene aberrations. They compared clinicopathologic features, treatment and general survival for KRAS G12 C, KRAS wildtype (KRASwt), KRAS-mutated (KRASmut); and other KRAS (KRASother) mutations.

As reported in Lung Cancer, among 1,386 NSCLC patients, 1,040 were excluded due to non-metastatic/recurrent; unidentified KRAS status; ALK/EGFR/ROS1-positive status; or duplicates.

In General, 346 clients were analyzed: 144 (42%) were KRASmut, of whom 65 (45%) were KRAS G12 C. All patients with KRASG12 C were active or ex-smokers, versus 92%of KRASother and 83%of KRASWT.

The occurrence of brain metastases throughout follow-up was similar in between KRASmut and KRASwt (33%vs. 40%), and KRASG12 C and KRASother (40%vs. 41%).

The percentage of clients receiving one or multiple lines of systemic therapy was equivalent and overall survival was comparable in between KRASmut and KRASWT, and KRASG12 C and KRASother.

The authors conclude, “40%of clients with KRASG12 C NSCLC developed brain transition during follow up. Therefore, in this group of clients, treatments with excellent intracranial penetration have essential implications for long-term disease control. While we did not observe any prognostic impact of KRASG12 C mutations, the development of KRASG12 C targeted treatments, which have actually shown appealing early efficacy in KRASG12 C NSCLC, are anticipated to enhance results in the population.”

Dr. Cui stated, “Parallel to the lessons learned from EGFR- and ALK-aberrant NSCLC, agents that are effective for existing brain metastases, and that prevent or postpone brand-new brain metastases will be important for targeting KRASG12 C.”

” We did not discover differences in overall survival in between KRASG12 C and KRASother NSCLC, comparable to a previous U.S. research study, however different to a prior European research study,” she added. “Clients in our research study were mainly Caucasian (88%), and therefore our findings may not be generalizable to patients of different ethnic cultures worldwide.”

Dr. Joshua Sabari, an oncologist at NYU Langone Perlmutter Cancer Center in New York City who is involved in studies of KRASG12 C mutation inhibitors, told Reuters Health, “In the age of novel, active, and highly-potent KRASG12 C inhibitors such as MRTX849 and AMG510, information from this study support the development of targeted rehabs in this population.”

Particularly, he said by e-mail, the research study findings “solidify that KRASG12 C is a common alteration worthy of targeting. All patients identified to have KRASG12 C mutations were existing or former cigarette smokers, in line with what I see in my medical practice.”

” The activity of the KRAS G12 C inhibitors in the central nervous system remains unidentified,” he included. “Intracranial action rate will be crucial for the successful advancement of these agents, as over one quarter of patients in this research study presented with brain metastases at initial diagnosis.”

Like Dr. Cui, he said, “These data strengthen the value of unique KRASG12 C inhibitors currently being investigated in the center.”

SOURCE https://bit.ly/38 BAf23 Lung Cancer, online June 26, 2020.

Latest Posts

Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…

Latest Posts

Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…