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Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…

BLM Leader Tianna Arata Charged With 5 Felonies

Published Yesterday Social media is coming to the aid of Tianna Arata, a California-based Black Lives Matter organizer, who was arrested after a protest last month and is now facing some serious charges. Arata was arrested by the San Luis Obispo police department on July 21 after she organized a protest that allegedly resulted in…

Migrant workers need support, jobs at home after pandemic disruption: ILO

GENEVA (Reuters) – The U.N. labour agency appealed to governments on Wednesday to support tens of millions of migrant workers forced to return to their homelands due to the coronavirus pandemic only to face unemployment and poverty.

FILE PHOTO: Migrant workers and their families wait in lines outside a railway station to board a train to their home state of West Bengal, in Ahmedabad, India, June 18, 2020. REUTERS/Amit Dave/File Photo

Governments should include returning workers, many of whom had lost jobs overnight, in their social protection measures and reintegrate them into national labour markets, the International Labour Organization said in a report.

“This is a potential crisis within a crisis,” Manuela Tomei, director of the ILO’s conditions of work and equality department, told a news conference.

There are an estimated 164 million migrant workers worldwide, nearly half of them women, accounting for 4.7% of the global labour force, according to the ILO. Many work in health care, transport, domestic work and agriculture.

Their remittances are key for their families and economies back home, Tomei said, citing a report from the World Bank that a $100 billion drop in remittances was forecast by year-end.

Nearly a million migrant workers have returned to South Asia alone, said Michelle Leighton, chief of labour migration at ILO.

They include 500,000 Nepalese who returned from India, more than 250,000 Bangladeshis from the Middle East, 130,000 Indonesians, 100,000 Burmese and 50,000 Filipinos, mostly seafarers, ILO figures show.

Ethiopia expects from 200,000-500,000 migrants to return by year-end, Leighton added.

“There are serious problems with their eligibility for social protection, when they come back, for instance they are not able to take their social security entitlement and that is a function of the need for cooperation between the sending and receiving countries,” Leighton said.

Large numbers of migrant workers in the Gulf are affected by job losses, with more than 90,000 believed to have left Kuwait since April, said Ryszard Cholewinski of ILO’s Beirut office.

But not all left jobless in the Gulf want to repatriate, he said, adding that the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain have relaxed restrictions on changing employers.

Reporting by Stephanie Nebehay; Editing by Mark Heinrich

Latest Posts

Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…

Latest Posts

Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…