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Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…

BLM Leader Tianna Arata Charged With 5 Felonies

Published Yesterday Social media is coming to the aid of Tianna Arata, a California-based Black Lives Matter organizer, who was arrested after a protest last month and is now facing some serious charges. Arata was arrested by the San Luis Obispo police department on July 21 after she organized a protest that allegedly resulted in…

Washington state recognizes first caught so-called ‘murder hornet’

Aug. 1 (UPI)– The Washington State Department of Farming has caught its first Asian giant hornet.

The giant hornet was found in a department trap near Birch Bay in Whatcom County, a statement said Officials identified the hornet at a lab on Wednesday after it had actually been caught and sent for processing in mid-July.

It was the first Asian huge hornet to be detected in a trap in the state. Washington state previously verified 5 other hornets were discovered in the environment.

” This is encouraging due to the fact that it implies we know that the traps work,” Sven Spichiger, the department’s managing entomologist, stated in the declaration. “But it also indicates we have work to do.”.

The department’s next actions include using infrared electronic cameras and extra traps to catch live hornet specimens and efforts to track them back to their nest in order to get rid of the nest, according to the statement.

The Washington State Department of Agriculture stated in the declaration that their goal is to damage the entire nest by mid-September when the colony would begin to develop brand-new queens and drones, which impede the capacity to control the spread.

Asian giant hornets are estimated to be up to 2.5 inches long. Chris Looney, a entomologist in charge of exotic bugs at the Washington State Department of Agriculture, spoke to CBS Sunday Morning about the previous 5 hornets spotted and their predatory effect on honeybees.

The label “murder hornets'” may have come from a possible mistake in translation from Japanese that went viral after it was used in a New york city Times post, the Sunday early morning program reported.

In Japan, the Asian giant hornet has actually killed lots of people in recent years.

Looney told CBS Sunday Morning that the nickname overemphasizes the threat.

“‘ Murder hornet’ does not work, for a number of reasons,” Looney told CBS. “One of them, it overemphasizes the human health risk. These are human health risks, but like I stated, we do not wish to be stung by one. If you dislike one, undoubtedly, that can be truly harmful. And even if you’re not allergic, numerous stings certainly can cause being hospitalized and in some cases rarely even death. It turns out it’s not that numerous individuals that pass away from this any given year in the locations where it’s native.”

Latest Posts

Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…

Latest Posts

Ruby Bridges was 6 when she walked into a segregated school. Now she teaches children to get past racial differences.

Ruby Bridges is one of USA TODAY's Women of the Century. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we've assembled a list of 100 women who've made a substantial impact on our country or our lives over the past 100 years. Read about them all on Aug. 14.When 6-year-old Ruby Bridges walked up the…

Gamers and coaches we’ll miss out on without Huge Ten and Pac-12 football this fall

Analis Bailey, USA TODAY Published 6:24 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 | Updated 6:50 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020CLOSE SportsPulse: Paul Myerberg and Dan Wolken dissect how college football got to this point and rendered completely helpless to the raging pandemic in America. USA TODAYThe Big Ten and Pac-12 decided Tuesday to not play football…

Gayle King: ‘I like radio so much’

Skip to main content HomeCoronavirus Updates2020 Election ResultsElectionsNationWorldPoliticsFactcheckEducationInvestigationsHealthWeatherRace in AmericaImpeachmentJust the FAQsTracking 2020Gayle King reveals why she returned to radio with her new show "Gayle King In the House" on SiriusXM and what topics listeners want to discuss during these times of crises. (Aug.12)AP

‘So I guess Southwest has actually developed time travel’: Airline company sends out travelers strange flight changes

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET Aug. 12, 2020 CLOSE No assigned seats? Here are some of the biggest things that set Southwest Airlines apart from other carriers. USA TODAY"We've made a change to your upcoming trip.''Joanie Tran knows airline emails with that subject line are rarely good news, especially during a pandemic when…